How to Test USB Mass Storage Device Read/Write Speed ?

Following description show how to test linux usb mass-storage drivers/devices

Simple mass-storage bench-marking –

Mount usb mass-storage device at /mnt/usb (Note: for embedded target, you may need to use “su” to switch to root user for necessary mount permissions OR For desktop, you will need to use sudo)

$ sudo mount /dev/sdb1 /mnt/usb

Use dd command to create a temporary file inside mounted drive as,

$ time dd if=/dev/zero of=/mnt/usb/testfile bs=1024k count=10000

Above command will create a 10GB File into USB Drive and using “time” command we will know the time required to create ( which is any way write) 10GB file and using this statistics we can identify the write speed of the USB drive which we wanted to test.

Alternatively, to know the “Read Speed” you can copy the create 10GB file from USB drive to your local Ubuntu desktop/laptop.

$ sudo time cp -r /mnt/usb/testfile $PWD

Reference – http://kerneltrap.org/node/6933#comment-202486

CSGO - How To Fix High Ping & Packe... x
CSGO - How To Fix High Ping & Packet Loss!

Leave a Comment

Sign up to our newsletter!

ADB Commands Android Android Applications Android Build system Application Libraries Application Stack / User Interface Bash / Shell Scripts Bluetooth driver Cloud Technologies Commands and Packages Compilation Content Management System Core Kernel C Programs Development, Debugging and Performance Tools Development and Build Development Environment Setup Django & REST Api Errors & Failures Git Hardware Platforms HTML JAVA Programs Linux, OS Concepts and Networking Linux Device Drivers Linux Host, Ubuntu, SysAdmin Linux Kernel Linux Networking Middleware Libraries, HAL Multimedia NDK / Middleware / HAL Operating System Concepts PHP Programming Languages Scripting and Automation Search Engine Optimisation ( SEO ) Social Media Source Code Management ( SCM ) System Administration, Security Testing and Debugging Uncategorized Web Design and Development Website Hosting Wordpress Yocto Embedded Linux